Thesis Statement On The American Dream From The Great Gatsby

Thesis Statement On The American Dream From The Great Gatsby-12
He then gets killed after being tangled up with them.

He then gets killed after being tangled up with them.

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Chapter 1 places us in a particular year—1922—and gives us some background about WWI.

This is relevant, since the 1920s is presented as a time of hollow decadence among the wealthy, as evidenced especially by the parties in Chapters 2 and 3.

(He did work hard and honestly under Dan Cody, but lost Dan Cody's inheritance to his ex-wife.) In short, things do not turn out well for our dreamers in the novel!

Thus, the novel ends with Nick's sad meditation on the lost promise of the American Dream.

is a tragic love story on the surface, but it's most commonly understood as a pessimistic critique of the American Dream.

In the novel, Jay Gatsby overcomes his poor past to gain an incredible amount of money and a limited amount of social cache in 1920s NYC, only to be rejected by the "old money" crowd.

However, in Chapters 7 and 8, everything comes crashing down: Daisy refuses to leave Tom, Myrtle is killed, and George breaks down and kills Gatsby and then himself, leaving all of the "strivers" dead and the old money crowd safe.

Furthermore, we learn in those last chapters that Gatsby didn't even achieve all his wealth through hard work, like the American Dream would stipulate—instead, he earned his money through crime.

We learn about Gatsby's goal in Chapter 4: to win Daisy back.

Despite everything he owns, including fantastic amounts of money and an over-the-top mansion, for Gatsby, Daisy is the ultimate status symbol.

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