Orwell Politics And The English Language Thesis

Orwell Politics And The English Language Thesis-13
English: George Orwell in Hampstead On the corner of Pond Street and South End Road, opposite the Royal Free Hospital. In paragraph 16, Orwell compares "his words" to "cavalry horses answering the bugle", which create an analogy that is effective because both words and cavalry horses are powerful.4: Removing the extensive uses of examples in paragraphs 5, 6, 7 and 8 weakens Orwell's argument, and makes the passage less interesting and boring to read.

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His thesis is that any effect can become a cause, such that something that starts as an aid for a different ailment may eventually become detrimental.2: Orwell's analogy of the cause and effect of alcohol abuse to the demise of lanuage in paragraph two is very effective.

It shows a chain reaction, where the person starts drinking alcohol to combat a problem in their live, but then the alcohol eventually leads to more difficult problems.3: In Paragraph 4, Orwell uses a simile to compare "phrases tacked together" to "sections of a prefabricated henhouse".

Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it.

Our civilization is decadent and our language — so the argument runs — must inevitably share in the general collapse.

“Words of this kind are often used in a consciously dishonest way....

Statements like Marshal Pétain was a true patriot, The Soviet press is the freest in the world, The Catholic Church is opposed to persecution, are almost always made with intent to deceive.

That shows how prose consists of words that aren't necessarily chosen for their meaning, but instead just because it's easy.

In Paragraph 12, Orwell uses a similie to compare someone "choking" to "tea leaves blocking a sink", which shows how the author knows what he wants to say, but sometimes he has too many "stale phrases" in his head. Licensed under CC Attribution Share Alike 2.0 license" data-lightbox="media-gallery-1567787960"In paragraph 15, Orwell uses a similie to compare "a mass of Latin words fall upon the facts" to "soft snow", which blurs the outlines, and covers up the details.

It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes.

Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes.

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