Molly Ivins Humor Essay

Molly Ivins Humor Essay-27
Molly Ivins, Texas’ most famous resident journalist, pulls on a cigarette, shoves an errant strand of strawberry blond hair out of her eyes, stares down the mountains of notes and messages blanketing the surface of her rolltop desk, blinks twice through her glasses, stabs the play button on her answering machine, and states her goal for the day, and perhaps, the rest of her life.“What we try to avoid,” she says in a smoky voice that snags each and every syllable, “is that help-I’m-drowning feeling.” What Ivins is drowning in, of course, is her own success.The column was subsequently syndicated by Creators Syndicate and carried by hundreds of newspapers nationwide.

Molly Ivins, Texas’ most famous resident journalist, pulls on a cigarette, shoves an errant strand of strawberry blond hair out of her eyes, stares down the mountains of notes and messages blanketing the surface of her rolltop desk, blinks twice through her glasses, stabs the play button on her answering machine, and states her goal for the day, and perhaps, the rest of her life.“What we try to avoid,” she says in a smoky voice that snags each and every syllable, “is that help-I’m-drowning feeling.” What Ivins is drowning in, of course, is her own success.

in 2012 at the behest of my dear friend, James Egan, who wanted to make a film with me. I came home, and rather than going to sleep, I went to Google. It’s a deep archaeological dive when you go into doing a documentary on somebody and their life.

I Googled until two or three in the morning and watched Molly on C-SPAN and a variety of stuff. The good news was that her papers were housed at the Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas in Austin. I lived there [in Austin] for different periods of time in 2013, 2015, and 2016.

“There are two kinds of humor,” she said in a 1991 magazine story.

“One kind that makes us chuckle about our foibles and our shared humanity…the other kind holds people up to public contempt and ridicule—that’s what I do.” Ivins, who grew up in a conservative household in Houston, is best known for her work in the .

John’s and was a child of Texas oil and gas privilege.

Molly Ivins Humor Essay

Much of her character was formed in conflicts with her strait-laced Republican father, who was known as General Jim or Admiral Jim because of his stern authoritarianism.

Her witticisms are front-and-center, as when she said, “I’m not anti-gun; I’m pro-knife” or “You got to have fun while you’re fighting for freedom, ‘cause you don’t always win.” piece: “She’s not only a prophet; she’s the voice of now.

She is more relevant today than she probably was when she was alive.”The struggles of Ivins to go it alone in what was then substantially a man’s world and to overcome alcoholism and cancer are part of this engrossing documentary.

We spoke to the film’s director, Janice Engel, about Ivins’s fierce spirit and the lessons today’s young people can take from her legacy about taking political action.

Texas Monthly: What drew you to Molly Ivins and creating this documentary? I grew up in New York and then came to California to go to college, so I wasn’t part of her constituency. So this was really my introduction to her, seeing the play.

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  • Raise Hell The Life & Times of Molly Ivins Movie Review.
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    Days ago. There was never anybody like Molly Ivins before, and never will be. and national politics with the sharp eye and mordant sense of humor that.…

  • Remembering Molly Ivins, 1944-2007 - TIME
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    Jan 31, 2007. She was passionate, funny, liberal, larger than life — and a hero to a. Molly Ivins died Wednesday, January 31, 2007, after a long battle with breast cancer. being spent on investigative journalism and grand photo essays.…

  • What Would Molly Think. by Molly Ivins Creators Syndicate
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    Jan 28, 2009. THE FOLLOWING COLUMN WAS WRITTEN BY MOLLY IVINS' FORMER. She would have loved the drama, the comedy and the characters.…

  • Is Texas America? The Nation
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    Oct 30, 2003. By Molly Ivins. watchdog of democracy, noticed that the question about any unfortunate involvement with law enforcement looked funny.…

  • Appreciation Columnist Molly Ivins NPR
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    Feb 1, 2007. Texas columnist Molly Ivins died Wednesday of breast cancer. BRAND In an essay called "Living with Death," Molly Ivins wrote, I've always liked. and with her sense of humor and her ability to tell stories she made herself.…

  • The Price of Being Molly – Texas Monthly
    Reply

    Nov 1, 1992. But for Molly Ivins, success has been no laughing matter. Because the truth is, for Molly Ivins, fame hasn't been all that funny. Perhaps the most disheartening example is the first essay in her book, which she calls “an.…

  • A Guide to the Molly Ivins Papers, 1936, 1944-2008
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    Because of her wit, humor, and unabashed criticism of political and public figures, Ivins was a. Papers and essays about, referring to, or quoting Molly Ivins.…

  • Why We Need Molly Ivins's Wisdom Now More Than Ever.
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    Aug 29, 2019. Raise Hell The Life and Times of Molly Ivins, which premiered at. Jim Hightower said, Molly knew that humor was the door key to the brain.…

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