In His Essays And Lectures Ralph Waldo Emerson

In His Essays And Lectures Ralph Waldo Emerson-54
In taking the short view, we lose sight of the quality and significance of our lives in the present.Moreover, everyday details so preoccupy us that little time is left for more serious considerations.

In taking the short view, we lose sight of the quality and significance of our lives in the present.Moreover, everyday details so preoccupy us that little time is left for more serious considerations.

Gilman), and the 1983 Library of America Essays & Lectures (selected and annotated by Joel Porte).

Emerson prefaces "Experience" with a poem describing the solemn procession of the "lords of life" — the forces that affect all men's experience of common life.

Our innate love of absolutes draws us toward the permanent, but our human constitution requires "change of objects." After we have formed an impression of a book or a work of art, we want to move on, even though our lasting sense of that object may not be fully developed. Each book or work of art offers only partial insight into the whole.

Individual men, too, only represent particular aspects of human nature and capability, and do not expand to illuminate traits or ideas beyond those they possess.

The experience of life is confusing, Emerson writes at the beginning of the essay.

Gaining perspective on life while we are engaged in living is difficult.

Each man has a particular talent, and his tendency is to reinforce and capitalize upon that talent rather than to grow in other ways.

This self-limitation necessitates our examining all of humankind to gain a sense of the whole.

Constant criticism of various institutions and courses of action has led to widespread indifference.

Emerson urges the reader to tend to his own life as it is.

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