Critical Essay Of The Story Of An Hour

Critical Essay Of The Story Of An Hour-4
A: Without “her,” the sentence means that Louise Mallard has been living for her husband, that he has been the center of her life, that he has been her reason for living. Mallard means by her newly recognized “possession of self-assertion,” what she means by whispering, “Free! ” Q: Why are there two versions of that sentence, with and without the “her”?

A: Without “her,” the sentence means that Louise Mallard has been living for her husband, that he has been the center of her life, that he has been her reason for living. Mallard means by her newly recognized “possession of self-assertion,” what she means by whispering, “Free! ” Q: Why are there two versions of that sentence, with and without the “her”?

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This is especially important with “The Story of an Hour,” because some online versions of the story–and some published versions–omit a word that changes the meaning of what Kate Chopin is saying. Readers and scholars often focus on the idea of freedom in “The Story of an Hour,” on selfhood, self-fulfillment, the meaning of love, or what Chopin calls the “possession of self-assertion.” There are further details in what critics and scholars say and in the questions and answers below.

In the middle of the story, some online versions’ sentence reads, “There would be no one to live for during those coming years; she would live for herself.” Compare that with the sentence as it appears in our online text: “There would be no one to live for her during those coming years; she would live for herself.” If you don’t see why the word matters, or if you want to understand why there are two versions of the story, check our questions and answers below. And you can read about finding themes in Kate Chopin’s stories and novels on the Themes page of this site.

Throughout the story, one hopes Louise will gain her freedom.

Ironically, she is granted freedom, but only in death.

Louise immediately takes herself to a room where, "facing the window [sat] a comfortable, roomy armchair" (Chopin 470).

The news of her husband's death leaves her feeling lost and confused, seeking answers about her future.He focuses on the scene in Louise’s bedroom and points out how unrealistic her notion of love is.Her death, he writes, is the only place that will offer her the absolute freedom she desires.Read the story online Characters Time and place Themes When the story was written and published What critics and scholars say Questions and answers Accurate texts Articles and books about the story A graphic short story You can read the story in our online text.If you’re citing a passage from this or other Kate Chopin stories for research purposes, it’s a good idea to check your citation against one of these printed texts.Mallard's escape from oppression at the ironic cost of her life.Chopin sets the story in the springtime to represent a time of new life and rebirth, which mirrors Louise's discovery of her freedom.Getting a glimpse of her life with an absolute and fresh freedom gives her the strength to abandon a life of solitude and to "spread her arms out [. Aside from the springtime, Chopin creates an atmosphere that parallels ... Unfortunately, her hope for long years and many beautiful spring days was abruptly ended in an ironic twist. Mallard had survived, and within an hour the promises of a bright future for Mrs. Her grievous death was misconstrued as joy to the others: "they said she had died of heart disease-of joy that kills" (Chopin 471).This statement embodies the distorted misconception that a woman lives only for her man. To Louise her life was elongated at the news of her husband's death, not cut short.“This astonishing story strongly indicates that the sudden success which [the publication in 1894 of] brought Kate Chopin was of crucial importance in the author’s own self-fulfillment.It gave her a certain release from what she evidently felt as repression or frustration, thereby freeing forces that had lain dormant in her.

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