An Inspector Calls Essay Socialism

His connections with the city were also marked by the naming of the J. Priestley Library at the University of Bradford, which he officially opened in 1975, Priestley had a deep love for classical music, especially chamber music.

This love is reflected in a number of Priestley's works, notably his own favourite novel Bright Day (Heinemann, 1946).

He was badly wounded in June 1916, when he was buried alive by a trench mortar.

He spent many months in military hospitals and convalescent establishments, and on 26 January 1918 was commissioned as an officer in the Devonshire Regiment and posted back to France late summer 1918.

Priestley himself, however, was distrustful of the state and dogma, though he did stand for the Cambridge University constituency in 1945.

Priestley's name was on Orwell's list, a list of people which George Orwell prepared in March 1949 for the Information Research Department (IRD), a propaganda unit set up at the Foreign Office by the Labour government.

; 13 September 1894 – 14 August 1984) was an English novelist, playwright, screenwriter, broadcaster and social commentator.

His Yorkshire background is reflected in much of his fiction, notably in The Good Companions (1929), which first brought him to wide public notice.

In 1940, Priestley wrote an essay for Horizon magazine, where he criticised George Bernard Shaw for his support of Stalin: "Shaw presumes that his friend Stalin has everything under control.

Well, Stalin may have made special arrangements to see that Shaw comes to no harm, but the rest of us in Western Europe do not feel quite so sure of our fate, especially those of us who do not share Shaw's curious admiration for dictators." During the Second World War, he was a regular broadcaster on the BBC.

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