Alexander Pope Essay On Criticism Summary

Alexander Pope Essay On Criticism Summary-63
The final section of the poem discusses the moral qualities and virtues inherent in the ideal critic, who is also the ideal man — and who, Pope laments, no longer exists in the degenerate world of the early eighteenth century.Alexander Pope, a translator, poet, wit, amateur landscape gardener, and satirist, was born in London in 1688.Published in 1711, this poetic essay was a venture to identify and define his own role as a poet and a critic.

The final section of the poem discusses the moral qualities and virtues inherent in the ideal critic, who is also the ideal man — and who, Pope laments, no longer exists in the degenerate world of the early eighteenth century.Alexander Pope, a translator, poet, wit, amateur landscape gardener, and satirist, was born in London in 1688.Published in 1711, this poetic essay was a venture to identify and define his own role as a poet and a critic.

He should not be over ambitious and over imaginative but critics can go beyond their intention.

Artist has to undergo practice, learning and experiences. Pope says, “A little learning is a dangerous thing”. A critic if has pride, can’t take out the real essence from the text.

What, in Pope's opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin — a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin?

All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

This section offers general principles of good criticism (and of poetry--since criticism for Pope means determining the merit of a work rather than its meaning, understanding the principles of good criticism means understanding the rules for good poetry and vice versa).

Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism is an ambitious work of art written in heroic couplet.Only God, the infinite intellect, the purely rational being, can appreciate the harmony of the universe, but the intelligent and educated critic can appreciate poetic harmonies which echo those in nature.Because his intellect and his reason are limited, however, and because his opinions are inevitably subjective, he finds it helpful or necessary to employ rules which are interpretations of the ancient principles of nature to guide him — though he should never be totally dependent upon them.Now, it is not necessary to go to nature again because to follow the classical artist is to go to the nature.So, sources of art are society and ancient artists.By taking the ideas of classical artists, a critic has to judge the text.Artist can’t go beyond his intention, he is limited within his desires.This essay by Pope is neoclassical in its premises; in the tradition of Horace and Boileau.Pope believes that the value of literary work depends not on its being ancient or modern, but on its being true to Nature. Nature is to be found both in the matter and in the manner of expression, the two being inseparable.We should note, in passing, that in "The Essay on Criticism" Pope is frequently concerned with "wit" — the word occurs once, on average, in every sixteen lines of the poem. Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided — insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them.He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Alexander Pope Essay On Criticism Summary

The Latest from book-old2.ru ©